for Sirens and Sylphides
by Hubert Heldner






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Pearl & shell ring in yellow gold 0.750

These rings will ban the destructif power, even stronger than the will to self-preservation, if offered to your favorite siren or sylphide. More on this subject below.

pearl & shell ring
S 01
EURO 812.-
ring size No 49
7.1 grammes
pearl & shell ring
S 02
EURO 812.-
ring size No 53
7.1 grammes
pearl & shell ring
S 03
EURO 812.-
ring size No 53
8.0 grammes
pearl & shell ring
S 04
sold
pearl & shell ring
S 05
sold
pearl & shell ring
S 06
EURO 812.-
ring size No 56
7.7 grammes
pearl & shell ring
S 07
EURO 812.-
ring size No 52
7.2 grammes
pearl & shell ring
S 08
sold
pearl & shell ring
S 09
EURO 812.-
ring size No 53
7.5 grammes
pearl & shell ring
S 10
EURO 1104.-
ring size No 50
9.2 grammes
Black Tahiti Pearl 9.04 ct
pearl & shell ring
S 11
sold
pearl & shell ring
S 12
sold
pearl & shell ring
S 10
pearl & shell ring
S 10
All jewels are signed with this registered trademark

by Hubert Heldner
orders & inquiries

The erotic power of the voice, particularly when singing and accompanied by music, is empitomized in the myth of the Sirens who lured sailors to their death. The Lorelei who haunts the rock on the Rhine near St Goar, celebrated in the poem by Heinrich Heine (1797-1856), and the noumerous mermaid legends, are variations on the same theme. In the greek myth, crafty Odysseus - warned by an other enchantress, his lover the nymph Circe - cheats the Sirens by having himself tied to the mast of his ship as it passes Sicily, while his companions stop their ears with wax. In some versions of the Siren myth, the sea nymphs imitate the voices of loved ones.
source: Plaisirs d'amour by Elisabeth Nash

Mermaids entice human lovers with their songs of enchantment. They cause ship-wrecking storms and are moste frequently seen combing their long hair whilst admiring themselfs in mirrors.
source: Faeries by Brian Froud & Alan Lee

Sylphides are the freshwater counterpart of the Sirens and are said to live in lakes, rivers and ponds.


"Jewels from the deep"
Book illustration perhaps connected with Undine.
Painting by Arthur Rackham 1909

"....certain stars shot madly from their spheres to hear the sea-maid's music," Illustration of A Midsummer Night's Dream.
Painting by Arthur Rackham 1908

"The Cave of the Storm Nymphs"
Painting by Sir Edward Poynter 1836-1919

Detail from
"Hylas and the Nymphs"
by John William Waterhouse